Dorothy

What's New With Dotty:

Dotty continues to cement her reputation as one of the best Bridge players in all of Somers, New York. Twice a week, she strangles the competition, crushes them to a fine red paste under her heel, and makes them sorry they ever learned to pick up a deck of cards!

She's also been reading the books of Alyson Richman (see Reading Recommendations below). What's the connection? Alyson Richman is a highly-regarded young novelist who lives in Huntington Bay...in the very house that Loring and Dotty had built for themselves in 1970 (and which has been featured in Architectural Digest, The New York Times, and House Beautiful). Loring and Dotty recently paid a visit to the house, met Ms. Richman, and got an advance copy of her book Swedish Tango.

Dossier:
Dorothy "Dotty" Mandel is the reigning matriarch of the Mandel Family. Wife/Keeper of Loring and bearer of sons Alan and Josh, Dorothy was born in Glen Cove, New York on February 15th, 1928. She and Loring were married on July 9th, 1950. Their 50th Anniversary was celebrated in high style on July 9th, 2000.

 In an official capacity, she's the Past President of the Huntington chapter of Meals on Wheels. In a somewhat less official capacity, she's doting grandmother to Hannah and Eliza. She's a marvelous and inventive cook and baker whose recipes have been published in the late, lamented Long Island Press and elsewhere. But she's also kind of a Private Dick; along with the District Attorney of Suffolk County, she set up a scam operation to catch and convict charity frauds connected to organized crime in New York. She was decorated for her efforts at the Suffolk County Courthouse in 1994.

Dotty made the Big Money for Meals on Wheels!

Loring and Dotty.
Photo Credit: Charlotte Browning

Recent Reading Recommendations:

The Mask Carver's Son by Alyson Richman
Swedish Tango by Alyson Richman

To send her email, click right here.

There was a moose behind her, but Loring JUST missed it.
Dotty in Talkeetna, Alaska, in June, 2002. Talkeetna was a quiet little town where you'd better not try to get breakfast in anything less than an hour. The view of Mt. McKinley from the Talkeetna Lodge was spectacular, and we were fortunate in arriving on an exceptionally clear day.